Book Review : I am Mixed and I am Me

To be proud of one's identity!


Acceptance of the self and others through appreciation and empathy lies at the heart of Sarah Porter’s book I’m Mixed and I’m Me. And while the subject seems one that needs to be pondered on, the presentation is just the contrary. A delightful read, it can aptly address tender minds and enable them to imbibe the message, which is crucial and compelling.

The book begins with Snacks introducing himself and his sister, Wiggles, and promising to tell the reader "our own story," which he admits is rather unique. The first thing that we get to know is that their parents are from "different places," an aspect that gets starkly noted due to their obvious difference in skin color. Nonetheless, black lips kiss as softly as white ones and both parents are similar in showering love and shaping lives.

Book cover
Click HERE to buy the book

Snacks assert that they are lucky to have dissimilar parents as that allows them to go on an exploratory journey from the northern Maine woods or Mama’s home to Jamaican beaches or Daddy’s place. Moreover, the parents teach them different things, and thus, their knowledge keeps growing.

So, being "Mixed" has perks of its own, but nothing comes without pain as well. They are singled out wherever they go as others wonder what their color must show. But that does not bother them as they keep snacking, dancing, playing, and celebrating their mixed-ness.

The story offers a simple solution to a profound problem. It lies in the realization that your skin color does not define you. Look inside to feel that all of us are the same, and while races and cultures may segregate us, humanity and kindness unites us into an undivided whole.

Book cover

I'm Mixed and I'm Me , thus, a must-read for everyone. Indeed through a fun-filled engagement with Sarah Porter’s rhythmic versatility and Carlos Solano’s vivacious pictures, we gain an understanding of concepts like identity and its formation, racial and cultural diversity, family and society, and all that ultimately leads to empowerment and unity.

I'm Mixed and I'm Me Review

As part of a mixed couple, we often receive stares, and my children get questions. It is so important to teach children to focus on the similarities rather than the differences and to understand that love breaks all barriers. Love the book!
Dr. Deborah Gracia, D.O. and mom

Sarah Porter has written a delightful, rhyming book with colorful illustrations that will help children of all cultures and races be proud of their identity and give them a sense of belonging. Children will understand the importance of embracing diversity and accepting others-regardless of the color of their skin or their diverse heritages. This book will delight all children who, at some point, will struggle with their identity.
Kim Larkins, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, author of Emma Lou the Yorkie Poo: Breathing in the Calm

I'm Mixed and I'm Me is a must-read for any family, especially those with multicultural children. Beautifully written and colorfully illustrated, it's an excellent book to read with your kids. It teaches children the simple yet all-important lessons of self-love and empowerment.
Dr. Sonali Ruder, ER physician and founder of TheFoodiePhysician.com

By: Quotidian Tales

Disclaimer:
This article and the opinions expressed in it are personal opinions. It is not meant for imposing specific views or endorsing a particular way of life. Also please do ignore any errors or omissions that you might come across. We pledge to learn from them. Happy viewing.

Comments

Fransic Verso said…
Interesting, this seem good book for my little cousin and will suggest my aunt this book. Thank you for sharing this book review!
Victoria said…
What an exceptional review of the book! Seems like a fantastic one, one that not only mixed people should read. Where I come from, mixed people are kind of the norm and accepted.
Hannah said…
Beautiful context and would love to add this to our library. Thanks for this review!

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